Diane Fenster: Pioneering Digital Photoshop Artist

 
   Diane Fenster

 Diane Fenster

Diane Fenster’s art has been called an important voice in the development of a true digital aesthetic. Her work is in the permanent collections of museums, corporations and private collectors. Her work has been exhibited internationally and both her fine art and her commercial photo illustrations have inspired both admiration and imitation. She is a pioneer in our field.

In many ways Diane work has broadened the boundaries of photography and illustration. It has often been a difficult course to set. In the early days when artists who used the computer in their art making presented their work, no one new where they belonged. They didn’t fit into any of the traditional categories of how one produces an image. The boundaries seemed narrow and set.

Diane’s work has cut a course which has helped all of us expand the definitions of what are possible in image making. Digital photography and illustration now stand on their own and are widely accepted both in the commercial world and by the fine artist. Because of Diane and artists like her, computer based photography, digitally based art and illustration of all stripes have claimed their own territories.

She calls herself an alchemist using a new technology. In Diane’s own words “I began creating digital images in 1989 and begged a beta copy of the original Photoshop before it was released to the public. I haven’t looked back since.”

For the past thirteen years she has transformed our visions and dreams, challenged our boundaries of perception and thought, and has helped set the high standards of the new field of digitally based art making. We thank her for that and acknowledge her efforts and talents by her induction into the Photoshop Hall of Fame.

For more on Diane, visit her Website

 
 The three original Photoshop Hall of Famers: (L to R) Dianne Fenster, Dan Margulis (far right) Thomas Knoll

The three original Photoshop Hall of Famers: (L to R) Dianne Fenster, Dan Margulis (far right) Thomas Knoll